Cut One: Promoting Vegetative Growth

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Young trees if not pruned develop weak branches bearing excessive fruit early in their lives, but reduced crops as they mature. They develop their own shape, rather than the one the orchard owner wants, usually with an excess of crowded, vertical material. With correct pruning  in the early years, the tree will develop a strong structure of framework branches that will crop well and be easier to manage in the future.  In our last blog, we introduced our Guide to Best Pruning Practice in Four Cuts.  These are the four essential pruning cuts that once mastered will provide you with the tools to manage your fruit trees throughout their life. This blog will look at Cut One which is used to promote strong, new growth.  Continue reading

Winter Or Summer Pruning?

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Winter is the traditional time of year to prune apple and pear trees. The reasons for this are partly historical. January and February were quieter months in the agricultural calendar when farm labourers were available to work in the orchards.

In fact, pruning can be done in summer and winter.

As a  general rule winter pruning promotes vegetative growth; summer pruning slows growth and encourages fruit production.

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