Cut Three: Encouraging A Branch To Break Bud

 

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Losing a branch through storm damage or from the weight of too much fruit can create unwanted gaps in the canopy.  Cut Three in our Guide To Best Pruning Practice, is useful when you want to stimulate the growth of new shoots so that the tree can develop a replacement limb.  This particular cut needs to come with a health warning, though, as it is the most misunderstood and misused pruning cut.  Unlike Cut One,  you will be pruning two-year or older wood so it is important to understand how the tree will respond.  Continue reading

Cut One: Promoting Vegetative Growth

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Young trees if not pruned develop weak branches bearing excessive fruit early in their lives, but reduced crops as they mature. They develop their own shape, rather than the one the orchard owner wants, usually with an excess of crowded, vertical material. With correct pruning  in the early years, the tree will develop a strong structure of framework branches that will crop well and be easier to manage in the future.  In our last blog, we introduced our Guide to Best Pruning Practice in Four Cuts.  These are the four essential pruning cuts that once mastered will provide you with the tools to manage your fruit trees throughout their life. This blog will look at Cut One which is used to promote strong, new growth.  Continue reading

Best Pruning Practice In Four Cuts: Introduction

IMG_0697Why do we prune a tree?  The simplest answer is to give the tree the best chance of a long, productive life. There are, though, many reasons for pruning. For fruit, we want light and air penetrating the centre of the tree; to benefit wildlife, we may want to rebalance a tree that is no longer productive so that it remains standing; or we may just want to create an attractive shape.

Most pruning guides get very complicated very quickly.  We will show you 4 cuts and how the tree will respond to them. Each pruning cut has a specific purpose such as controlling growth, removing damaged or badly placed branches or stimulating the formation of flowers and fruits. Once you understand how a tree will react to being cut in these 4 ways, you have the tools to manage your fruit trees.  Of course, you can choose to get into the complicated stuff – but start here. Continue reading

Water Shoots And Suckers

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The orchard at Houghton Farm had been neglected for a number of years. To bring the trees under control, they were pruned hard last winter.  Orchard Origins spent a day last week cutting out some of the unwanted shoots that had sprouted up in response.  They were crowding the canopy and the centre of the trees and were preventing light from reaching the ripening fruit.  Continue reading

Pruning Young Trees

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Planting a cider apple and perry pear orchard at Houghton Feb 2013

Orchard Origins went back to the Houghton Project this week to prune the apple and pear trees we planted a year ago. Pruning a tree in its early years – known as formative pruning – helps it to develop a strong, basic branch structure.  As discussed in a previous post Winter or Summer Pruning, formative pruning is best done in the winter when the tree is still dormant.

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